About

Nance-Major House

Bed & Breakfast

ca. 1869
National Register of Historic Places

The Nance-Major House is an historic home operated as a bed and breakfast accommodation in the heart of rural Charles City County, Virginia. The Whittaker and Jenkins families also operate a popular local restaurant in the adjacent historic old store, Cul’s Courthouse Grille. The family is deeply involved in the local community. The charm and personality of these historically significant buildings and their owners is apparent from the moment you arrive!

IN THE HEART OF HISTORY

The charming Greek Revival-style Nance-Major House Bed & Breakfast is convenient to the area’s abundant and historically rich attractions, including the James River Plantations (BerkeleyShirleySherwood Forest, and Westover).

The house is situated just off Virginia Byway Rt. 5, along the beautiful Virginia Capital Trail, dedicated, paved bicycle and pedestrian trail crossing four counties and 51.7 miles (83.2 km) between Jamestown and Richmond, Virginia — that is, between the Colony of Virginia’s first capital and Virginia’s current capital.

The Nance-Major House is also a short drive from many wedding venues, including Burlington PlantationJasmine PlantationApple Blossom PlantationNorth Bend PlantationMt. Stirling PlantationCousiac ManorCary Hill, and others.

Charles City county’s historic courthouse is located across from the Nance-Major House. Charles City itself is the birthplace of important U.S. citizens including 9th US President William Henry Harrison, 10th US President John Tyler, signer of the Declaration of Independence Benjamin Harrison, the founder of Liberia in Africa, Lott Cary, and first African-American Governor, Douglas L. Wilder.

Various Native American tribes have used this area for thousands of years. When the region was explored by the English in the 17th century, the Algonquian-speaking Chickahominy Tribe inhabited areas along the river that was later named for them by English colonists. The Chickahominy Suite at the Nance-Major house is named in honor of this local tribe.
The Paspahegh Indians lived in Sandy Point, and the Weanoc tribe lived in the Weyanoke Neck area. 

 

CLOSE TO FUN!

The inn is about a 30 minute drive from Busch Gardens Theme Park, Water Country USA, and the colonial capital of Williamsburg, as well as historic attractions Jamestown Settlement & Museum, and the American Revolution Museum at Yorktown. Yorktown also features a delightful beach and shopping district. The capital city of Richmond is a 20-minute drive up Route 5 to the west.

The area is served by several fine wineries, including Upper Shirley in Charles City; New Kent WineryGauthier Vineyard, and Saude Creek Vineyards in adjacent New Kent county; and the Williamsburg Winery to the east.

Just a few minutes away from the Nance-Major House is the Lazare Gallery, a Russian art gallery with inventory of more than 1100 paintings, and is considered the West’s foremost repository for Russian investment art.

The Lawrence Lewis Jr. Park, just minutes from the Nance-Major House, is a lovely small county facility  located on the James River, featuring a large fishing pier, boat ramp, gazebo, and picnic area. The James River offers watersport activities excellent for boating, fine fishing, kayaking, canoeing and nature watching. A healthy population of American eagles resides along the shoreline near the park. The Capital Trail has a spur leading nearly all the way to the park and can be accessed by bicycle from the Nance-Major House.

The Chickahominy Wildlife Management Area, on the county’s eastern border, features a boat ramp, fishing pier, sighting-in range, and nature trails. Harrison Lake National Fish Hatchery and the VCU Rice Center are also located nearby.

The Nance-Major House was recognized as an historically significant structure by the Virginia Department of Historic Resources and is on the National Register of Historic Places.

ARCHITECTURE

For those interested in historic architecture, one may find the Nance-Major House description  from the US Department of the Interior, National Parks Service’s  National Register of Historic Places, here.

Tiger swallowtail butterfly on sunflower by Terri Aigner